About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
incubator, and make room for the next big idea-- like enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing p
, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is always pointed at al qaeda and al qaeda-linked groups. because they view the attacks to have the fingerprints of that organization. it was extremely coordinated attack as you saw, more than 20 bombs, many car bombs and then for good measure they threw in some suicide bombers as well as sticky bombs on the bottoms of buses. most shi'a target and security targets. that sits in to what al qaeda is doing, try to destabilize the country by showing people its security forces can't protect them and trying to stir up the sectarian war that this country has recently emerged from. if. >> woodruff: how unusual is it to have so many attacks on the same day? >> it was a bad day, that is certainly indisputable. i was at a university today talking to university students and they were holding a party because they were graduating. you can see the smo
. the journal "science translational medicine" published the findings today. the treatment is experimental and has only been used on five adult patients whose bodies resisted chemotherapy. the treatment genetically alters a patient's own immune cells to fight the cancer. one patient saw all traces of his leukemia disappear within eight days of treatment. and three of the five patients have now been in remission for five to 24 months. general motors announced a recall of 27,000 vehicles because of problems with their automatic transmissions. the recall affects the 2013 models of buick's full-size lacrosse cars and cadillac's s.r.x. crossover s.u.v. g.m. cited a software problem that could cause the transmission to shift to sport mode and increase the risk of a crash, although none have been reported. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we continue our focus on the middle east with a deeper look at the question of chemical weapons and their possible use in syria. i'm joined by leonard spector, deputy director of the monterey institute's center for nonp
they said they wanted to give. libraries, exiewrpt labs, science labs, beautiful building. they're being sent to a school that is much, much older, not in good shape, and not really equipped to handle the children with special needs. >> announcer: let me ask you the same question i asked him about whether and to what extent chicago is failing its student today. where do you see the failure and where do you see the cost? >> i mean, i don't understand the-- what we're talking about when we're talking about fail. we have been failing poor and minority children across this country. it's not just chicago. it's everywhere. and the issue is we don't want to have honest conversations about poverty because doing these other things and focusing the conversation somewhere else allows people to not talk about the other issues. so in the poorer parts ofÑi tow, children have not had access to good things, and then all of a sudden, we're starting to see that happen. almost every single school that is on the bubble here, we've seen a lot of resources put in lately. but some, not so much at all. so the
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute betw
p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama called on young israelis to see the world through palestinian eyes and challenged israeli and palestinian leaders to abandon formulas and habits that have blocked peace. but even amid his visit, the old threats and realities of violence were present. margaret warner reports from jerusalem. >> warner: the second day of the president's trip to israel and the west bank was met with rocket fire from one place mr. obama won't go: hamas-controlled gaza two landed in sderot, israel in a clear breach of the ceasefire between the islamist hamas faction and israel struck late last year. there were no injuries. a little-known militant group claimed responsibility, saying it wanted to show that israel could not pro
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)